Why My Dog Loves Eating Poop

Dog Licking Lips

Why My Dog Loves Eating Poop

Of all the revolting habits that our canines have –rolling in mud, drinking from the loo, licking their and other animal’s butt, humping etc., poop-eating is one that tops all. They don’t do it to gross us out; they do it for a number of reasons which we shall discuss closely in this month’s blog. 

There are both medical and behavioral reasons why they eat stool. Medical reasons are much easier to treat but when a dog does it out of habit, it may take some time and effort on the pet owner’s part to give it up. 

Behavioral Reasons Why Canines Love Stool-Eating

Dogs love to sniff:

Dogs are natural scavengers; they love to explore their surroundings by sniffing everything. Unlike us humans, they aren’t as repulsed as we are by the scent of their feces. When they don’t find it repulsive, it is just another treat lying on the floor. If given the opportunity, they will eat it. 

They do what they see others doing:

We aren’t talking about humans of course. Most little pups get inspired by what they see other dogs doing. Older dogs who like the taste of the dung might exhibit an impression on a younger dog that this is an acceptable behavior. Therefore, they reciprocate what they see others doing. If you believe they have picked up such a habit form the neighbor’s dog whose owners don’t give a damn about what their dog does as long as it guards their home, it is best that you nip the habit in the bud.

It is bored:

If it is left home alone for long hours and doesn’t have much to do or play with, eating poop might become a way to entertain itself. To them, it will be a form of treat and we all know how much dogs love treats. 

They eat poop due to stress:

Another common reason why dogs eat their poop is to relieve any stress or anxiety they feel. This could be due to an elongated period of isolation, fear of other larger pets or lack of affection.

Housetraining punishment:

Many a times, pet owners use aggressive punishments when housetraining their pets. If your dog poops in the house and you rub it in his nose or aggressively shout at it, it may begin to eat it in order to hide the evidence. Harsh punishments often lead to such behavioral changes in dogs, which is why, many animals experts suggest that housetraining should be taught aggressively. 

They seek attention through it:

Dogs in particular, like to be praised and loved. If they think that by causing trouble is the only way they will get some attention from their owner, they might do it. 

Lack of space:

Pups that were born and raised in shelter homes didn’t grow up enjoying proper meals. They were kept in small cages and were starved. Such dogs would eat anything they could find, poop being a readily-available alternative. If this becomes a habit, it might be hard to change even if you bring the pet home and give it food and a larger space to live in.